Gorani

Overview Gorani is the third largest Kurdish language, next to Kurmanji and Sorani. It has linguistic relationships to both Northern and Southern Iranian languages, and has not bee

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Overview

Gorani is the third largest Kurdish language, next to Kurmanji and Sorani. It has linguistic relationships to both Northern and Southern Iranian languages, and has not been extensively researched by experts to make any final determination on origins.[i] Interestingly, Sorani seems to share some linguistic similarities with Gorani that point to some form of contact-induced language formation.[ii]

Hawrami, also spelled Hewrami, is the most favored dialect of Gorani, but there are many others that can be classified as relating to Gorani. The Hawrami dialect is what is used in standardized written code for Gorani. The language was given a sacred value it was used for writing the religious texts of the Ahl-e Haqq religion.[iii]

 

History

The title "Gorani" comes from a confusing history. Most accounts attest that it comes from the name given to the Guran people, who are distinct from the Kurds. It is confusing because today the Gorani language is used by those who identify as Kurds. Between the 14th-19th centuries, Gorani was the official written language for the Ardalan, a Kurdish principality in Iraq.[iv] 

 

Contemporary Uses

Gorani is typically used only by certain groups of primarily agricultural and pastoral populations in the Kermanshah province of Iran and some areas around Halabja, Iraq. Due to compulsory Iranian education in Persian and other political-socio-economic factors including the Halabja genocide, Gorani is only the third most common language in the area.[v] According to some data, several tens of thousands speak Gorani world-wide, although that number does not include all possible dialects. Very few literary works have been produced in modern times in Gorani.[vi]

 

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[i] Denise Baily, Parvin Mahmoudveysi. The Gorani Language of Zarda, a Village of West Iran. (2013.) Dr. Ludwig Reichert. Chapter 1.

 

[ii] Dr. Michael Leezenberg. "Gorani Influence on Central Kurdish." Kurdish Academy of Language. Retrieved 2014-05-22.

 

[iii] Denise Baily, Parvin Mahmoudveysi. The Gorani Language of Zarda, a Village of West Iran. (2013.) Dr. Ludwig Reichert. Chapter 1.

 

[iv] Denise Baily, Parvin Mahmoudveysi. The Gorani Language of Zarda, a Village of West Iran. (2013.) Dr. Ludwig Reichert. Chapter 1.

 

[v] Denise Baily, Parvin Mahmoudveysi. The Gorani Language of Zarda, a Village of West Iran. (2013.) Dr. Ludwig Reichert. Chapter 1.

 

[vi] Dr. Michael Leezenberg. "Gorani Influence on Central Kurdish." Kurdish Academy of Language. Retrieved 2014-05-22.

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